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Knight Writers

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The student news site of Robinson High School

Knight Writers

The student news site of Robinson High School

Knight Writers

The halftime show on the T.V.
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Perspectives on Deaf for a Day

What, I can’t hear you?
I%2C+Coleton+Rone%2C+with+earplugs+in+thinking+about+the+cacophony+of+nothingness+in+my+ears.
Photo Jordan De La Cruz
I, Coleton Rone, with earplugs in thinking about the cacophony of nothingness in my ears.

Deaf for a day, a new activity, a new class, an experience. Deaf for a day is a challenge for the students in American Sign Language (ASL). It requires all students to wear earplugs in order to experience the trials and tribulations that deaf people must face every day. Students were also mandated to wear bracelets to indicate that they were deaf to the staff. Being deaf was a profoundly different experience from my usual ways of life, there were a couple of challenges on a spectrum.

Being “deaf” is a spectrum, from what you would think of as deaf, like not being able to hear at all, to just having hearing problems like an old man. I was closer to an old man without his hearing aids rather than being fully deaf, but it still did cause challenges. I had issues listening to my friends and my teachers, so I did have to lip-read quite a bit. It wasn’t exactly impossible to hear, but lip reading improved my chances of understanding what was happening instead of repeating “What?” until my feeble mind could fathom the topic at hand.

I was quite lucky that most of my teachers usually have a visual aid during their lessons. One of these was John Taft the U.S history teacher. His class was probably the easiest, for he puts everything he says on his PowerPoints with the ideas of utmost importance being underlined and bold. Some classes were interesting due to me being “deaf,” like Orchestra. It wasn’t that bad, due to music not really changing, no matter if I hear it all or not. Overall, the whole day wasn’t so bad, it was just different.

I wasn’t the only one to be deaf, after all, multiple periods of ASL were required to participate like Daniel Ellis (’25) who expressed his unusual experience.

“Hearing my own voice loudly made my brain tickle,” Ellis said.

The ASL class was in my opinion quite eerie. It was explained the day before that the whole class would be silent, with us only being able to speak in sign language. Though I wasn’t completely deaf the whole day, I felt deaf during that ASL class. I couldn’t hear what I had been hearing, such as the faint talking of classmates and teachers. I heard nothing. It was a very off-putting feeling no lights buzzing, no blasting air conditioning, no birds, no bugs and no footsteps. This put it into perspective for me, how deaf people live. The class as a whole was intriguing, we all gathered and spoke but said nothing. We talked about how our days had been going up to that point. It was an experience to all be able to speak about one thing we now knew more about. I thought the class as a whole was enlightening.

ASL student Abdelrahman Abouzeid (’25) highlighted his struggle throughout the day.

“[I] wish I didn’t have to leap towards people so I can hear them better,” Abouzeid said.

Deaf for a day had come to an end. I feel that it was a success, I think I experienced a mere fraction of what Deaf people experience, but it provided me a base to understand how Deaf people feel and do things. I believe more people should experience this, and they most likely will next year, when ASL teacher Jessie Dorsey begins another Deaf for a Day.

“The goals I had for Deaf for a Day were for students to experience a degree hearing loss firsthand,” Dorsey said. “So that they would have an empathetic perspective on deaf culture and personally understanding why learning ASL is so important.”

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About the Contributors
Coleton Rone, Staff Writer
Coleton Rone is a junior and a staff writer for the Knight Writers. This is his first year on staff. Rone is looking toward being one of the new hosts for the Knight Writers' very own Knight Mic and is most excited for the environment and excitement that surrounds it. "I joined newspaper because I thought I would have a lot of fun doing the interviews [for Knight Mic]," Rone said. "I'm excited for the football games specifically...I think the interviews there are going to be very enjoyable because the environment at [football games] is an experience of its own." Outside of journalism, Rone enjoys tapping into his musical side, he enjoys listening to music and playing his instruments. He plays bass guitar on his own, but academically, Rone plays double bass for Orchestra. Aside from music, Rone is a true fitness enthusiast at heart, as he enjoys testing his physical limits with weightlifting. He expresses this passion of his by lifting at least 4 times per week. When he isn't becoming a rising musician and expressing his athletic abilities, Rone spends his free time with his many pets but primarily his cat named Duck while watching Amazing World of Gumball. When asked about his greatest inspiration, the top person that comes to his mind is his Dad. "...he's a good person [with] good moral values, and he doesn't do anything despicable or evil," Rone said. After he leaves Robinson, Rone isn't quite sure what he will do next. He plans on either going to a 4 year university to major in business, or going to a trade school to learn more about a career in mechanics. (Profile by Keirra McGoldrick)
Jordan De La Cruz, Staff Writer
Jordan De La Cruz is a junior at Robinson and a staff writer for Knight Writers. This is his first year on the staff. A true artist, De La Cruz partakes in many artistic hobbies including playing drums, guitar and even painting. "Anything creative I love to take part in," De La Cruz said. With an affinity for editing videos and having already written a few full-length stories, De La Cruz's passions for newspaper extend beyond the class. He felt joining newspaper would benefit his interests and wanted to expand his already formidable writing abilities. "As a writer I felt like this would be a super fun way to expand my influences with writing but also with the video editing," De La Cruz said. "I already have a good past in video editing that I think doing more of it would be great." While De La Cruz enjoys the opportunity to express his writing abilities, video creation is another thing that drew De La Cruz to newspaper. He looks forward to making content for the ongoing "Man on the street" videos under the Knight Mic series. De La Cruz looks forward to being able to build on the foundation left by previous classes and hopes to expand the coverage of Knight Mic videos beyond pep rallies and RHS sporting events. "I'm excited to be a host, be able to put my charisma on the screen," De La Cruz said. "Just being able to make videos with two friends of mine, I'm really excited." Never staying in one school for long, De La Cruz looks forward to finishing his final years at Robinson and leaving his mark on the school as a Knight Writer. "I used to move every year, but this is the only time I'm going to be able to finish the next three years at the same high school," De La Cruz said. "I'm super hopeful ... [that] I'll be able to have some sort of mark on the school." (Profile by Yesenia Rosario)
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